06210438 - Ethique et GRH

Crédits ECTS 3
Volume horaire total 23
Volume horaire CM 15
Volume horaire TD 8

Responsables

Fréderic Faye

Objectifs

Ce programme a une part importante couvrant les théories de la RSE avecc un objectif double: Fasciliter la reconnaissance des dilèmes éthique dans les organisations et structurer la reflexion sur cees situation. Une seconde partie vise à introdure les outils a disposition du gestionnaire pour répondre aux exigences de la situation. Enfin une troisième partie traite de la demande du marché pour la responsabilité social à travers les fonds dit socialement responsables.

CONNAISSANCES A ACQUERIR
Conaissance des trois théories de la RSE, Shareholder, stakeholder et corporate citizenship. Outils de gestion éthiqe. Prise de décision en situation éthique.

COMPETENCES CIBLES
Prise de décision. Implémentation de dispositif favorisant l'éthique. Rfelexion.

Contenu

1 Introduction
1.1 Requirements
1.2 Learning experience
1.3 Evaluation

2 Theory
2.1 Taxonomies of CSR theories
2.1.1 Klonoski (1991): 3 domaines de théories RSE
2.1.2 Windsor (2006): Three approaches to CSR
2.1.3 Garriga et Melé (2002): Four social dimensions approach
2.2 Moral dilemmas in organisations and moral relativism
2.2.1 The trolley dilemma
2.2.2 Measuring people's way of reasoning: Cognitive reaection test
2.3 Three visions of CSR
2.3.1 Shareholder value theory
2.3.2 Milton Friedmann
2.3.3 Stakeholder value theory
2.3.4 Corporate Citizenship

3 SRI and the business case of CSR
3.1 What is socially responsible investment?
3.2 Why investors consider extra _nancial criteria?
3.2.1 Actors of SRI
3.2.2 Demographics of SRI investors
3.3 Arguments for CSR?
3.3.1 Empirical Evidence on SRI performannce
3.3.2 Heterogeneous Results
3.4 Method used in SRI
3.5 SRI in France
3.5.1 French legislation on extra-_nancial reporting
3.5.2 Company compliance to NLE
3.5.3 The Grenelle process
3.5.4 Costs of reporting in France
3.6 Conclusion

4 CSR Through a Strategic Lens
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Strategic constraint and the CSR
4.2.1 Limitations of the strategic decision-making process
4.2.2 Example: CSR _lter at Nike
4.3 The strategic dangers of greenwashing
4.4 Strategic CSR model (Garriga & Melé)
4.5 CSR implementation 1: Short to medium term
4.6 CSR implementation 2: Medium to long term

5 Tools of the trade: Nudge theory
5.1 Introduction - How to favor CSR in practice?
5.2 Nudge theory: concepts
5.2.1 Overview
5.2.2 De_nitions
5.2.3 Theoreticla in_uences
5.2.4 Libertarian Paternalism
5.2.5 Choice architects
5.2.6 How people think and decide - why nudging works
5.3 Heuristics
5.3.1 Anchoring and Adjustment
5.3.2 Availability (perceived popularity-frequency-rarity, visibility, commonness)
5.3.3 Representativeness (stereotyping, comparison)
5.3.4 Optimism/over-con_dence (over/under-estimation, complacency, ignoring or taking risks)
5.3.5 Loss aversion (holding on, resistance)
5.3.6 Status quo bias (inertia, resistance to change, default to inaction)
5.3.7 Framing (orientation, accentuation, presentation)
5.3.8 Temptation (greed, ego, short-term reward, inability to delay grati_cation)
5.3.9 Mindlessness (negligence, not concentrating)
5.3.10 Self-control strategies (habits and routines to counter weaknesses)
5.3.11 Following the Herd (conforming, mob instinct) Following the Herd (conforming, mob instinct)
5.3.12 Spotlight E_ect (anxiety, pressure, 'all eyes on me', fear of making mistakes)
5.3.13 Priming (preparing people for thinking and decisions)
5.3.14 Stimulus Response Compatibility
5.3.15 Feedback (during thinking and decision making, enabling correction and useful experience)
5.4 How to implement Nudging?
5.5 How to use the toolkit
5.6 Conclusion

6 Cases and Exercises
6.1 Dilemma debates
6.2 Case: Timberland
6.3 Case: McJob

Bibliographie

OUVRAGES DE REFERENCE :
  • Ariely, D., Bracha, A., & Meier, S. (2009, February). Doing Good or Doing Well? Image Motivation and Monetary Incentives in Behaving Prosocially. American Economic Review, 99(1), 544–555.
  • Bénabou, R., & Tirole, J. (2010). Individual and corporate social responsibility. Economica, 77, 1–19.
  • Carroll, Archie B. "Ethical challenges for business in the new millennium: Corporate social responsibility and models of management morality." Business Ethics Quarterly (2000): 33-42.
  • Friedman, M. (2009). Capitalism and Freedom: Fortieth Anniversary Edition. University of Chicago Press.
  • Glazer, A., & Konrad, K. A. (2011). A Signaling Explanation for Charity. The American Economic Review, 86(4), 1019–1028.
  • Hamman, B. J. R., Loewenstein, G., & Weber, R. A. (2010). Self-Interest through Delegation : An Additional Rationale for the Principal-Agent Relationship. American Economic Review, 100(September), 1826–1846.
  • Lacetera, N., & Macis, M. (2008). Social Image Concerns and Pro-Social Behavior (No. 3771).
  • Mazar, N., & Zhong, C.-B. (2010, April). Do green products make us better people? Psychological Science, 21(4), 494–8.
  • Monin, B., & Miller, D. T. (2001). Moral Credentials and the Expression of Prejudice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81(1), 33–43.
  • Siegl, S. (2011). A legal framework for fiduciary duty encompassing the integration of ESG criteria.
  • Thaler, R. H., & Sunstein, C. R. (2008). Nudge: Improving decisions about health, wealth, and happiness. (No. 24). Yale University Press.
  • Friedman, A. L., & Miles, S. (2006). Stakeholders: Theory and Practice: Theory and Practice. Oxford University Press.

OUVRAGES COMPLÉMENTAIRES
  • Capelle-Blancard, G., & Monjon, S. (2010). Socially Responsible Investing : It Takes more than Words.
  • Carpenter, J. P., & Myers, C. K. (2007). Why Volunteer? Evidence on the Role of Altruism, Reputation, and Incentives (Vol. 302).
  • Dana, J., Cain, D. M., & Dawes, R. M. (2006, July). What you don’t know won’t hurt me: Costly (but quiet) exit in dictator games. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 100(2), 193–201.
  • Dana, J., Weber, R. a., & Kuang, J. X. (2006, September). Exploiting moral wiggle room: experiments demonstrating an illusory preference for fairness. Economic Theory, 33(1), 67–80.
  • Funk, P. (2010). Social Incentives and Voter Turnout : Evidence from the Swiss Mail Ballot System. Journal of the European Economic Association, 8(5), 1077–1103.
  • Hofmann, E., Meier-Presti, K., Kirchler, E., & Meier-Pesti, K. (2007, August). The Decision Process for Ethical Investment. Journal of Financial Services Marketing.
  • Monin, B., Sawyer, P. J., & Marquez, M. J. (2008). The Rejection of Moral Rebels : Resenting Those Who Do the Right Thing. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95(1), 76–93.
  • Nilsson, J. (2008). Investment with a Conscience : Examining the Impact of Pro-Social Attitudes and Perceived Financial Performance on Socially Responsible Investment Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics, 83, 307–325.
  • Rield, A., & Smeets, P. (2013). Social preferences and portfolio choice. Working paper.
  • Utz, S., Wimmer, M., Steuer, R. E., & Hirschberger, M. (2014). Tri-criterion inverse portfolio optimization with application to socially responsible mutual funds. European Journal of Operational Research, 234(2), 491–498.

Contrôles des connaissances

Examen Terminal
Ecrit (1h)
Nature de l'épreuve : Questions de cours et de refelxion

Informations complémentaires

MODALITES PEDAGOGIQUES / NATURE DES SUPPORTS
Diapositifs de cours et fascicule de travial comprenant 4 études de cas ainsi que des 'dilèmes moraux' sujet à reflexion.

PRE-REQUIS EN TERMES DE CONNAISSANCES
Conaissance de base des théories économiques le plus courantes. Vocabulaire de gestion. Anglais.

LECTURE(S) CONSEILLÉE(S) :
  • Thaler, R. H., & Sunstein, C. R. (2008). Nudge: Improving decisions about health, wealth, and happiness. (No. 24). Yale University Press.
  • Friedman, A. L., & Miles, S. (2006). Stakeholders: Theory and Practice: Theory and Practice. Oxford University Press.
  • Carroll, Archie B. "Ethical challenges for business in the new millennium: Corporate social responsibility and models of management morality." Business Ethics Quarterly (2000): 33-42.
  • Friedman, M. (2009). Capitalism and Freedom: Fortieth Anniversary Edition. University of Chicago Press.